Search Site
Menu
Understanding the Different Degrees of Battery

There are different degrees of battery in the state of Wisconsin, ranging from misdemeanors to felonies. In its simplest definition, battery is physically harming another person. If the victim is touched in a matter that is offensive, harmful, painful, or violent, this constitutes as battery. There are different degrees and levels that we will discuss below.

1. Misdemeanor Battery

A misdemeanor battery is the general definition. It’s when you cause intended harm to another person and do it without consent. This is considered a Class A misdemeanor. This carries up to nine months in jail and fines up to $10,000.

2. Class I Felony Battery

This felony is also called “substantial battery.” This is more serious than the misdemeanor because the victim received substantial bodily harm. Substantial bodily harm includes:

  • Any injury that requires staples or stitches
  • Broken bones or nose
  • Concussion and temporary loss of consciousness
  • Loss of tooth
  • Burns

If convicted of class I felony, you could receive up to 3 ½ years in prison, plus $10,000 in fines.

3. Class H Felony Battery

This battery is when the person intends to cause harm, and the victim receives great bodily harm. This is also called aggravated battery. Great bodily harm includes:

  • Risk of death
  • Permanent disfigurement
  • Loss or impairment of a body part

This felony level carries a prison sentence up to six years, as well as fines up to $10,000.

4. Class E Felony Battery

This is very similar to class H, except there was intent to cause great bodily harm, and it resulted in great bodily harm. There’s only a slight difference, and the charge could decrease to a class H felony if they couldn’t prove there was an “intent to cause great harm” over an “intent to cause harm.” The most serious felony carries a possible prison sentence of up to fifteen years and a $50,000 fine.

Knowing the differences between the degrees of battery could protect you legally. If you have been charged with battery, please contact us.

Hart Law Office Videos
About Hart Law Office
Divorce FAQs

Q: What is a divorce?

A: A divorce is the legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when filing the divorce papers with the court. The reasons given when filing are referred to as the grounds for divorce.

Read More ›
Ebook Download

Enter your email address in the field below and we will send you a copy of our FREE ebook.

Contact us

Quick Contact Form